Journal club paper for 1/26/16

Please join us for journal club this week. We’ll be talking about R2D2 and meiotic drive in mice. Emerson Khost will present the following paper:
A Multi-Megabase Copy Number Gain Causes Maternal Transmission Ratio Distortion on Mouse Chromosome 2
http://journals.plos.org/plosgenetics/article?id=10.1371/journal.pgen.1004850

 

If you have an idea to share, topic to discuss or just want to let the group know about an exciting paper, then please add comment below. If you have a slide to add to the rapid fire session, please e-mail it to Amanda (alarracu@bio.rochester.edu) before 12pm on Tuesday 1/26.

Didion

2015 UR Biology Department Retreat

Thanks to those who made this year’s retreat a success. We kicked off the retreat with a BBQ/bonfire party and a hilarious game of Bio-pictionary. The next day had two outstanding alumni speakers (Dr. Snow Shen and Dr. Rob Unckless), relaxation, hiking, wine tasting, games and a vibrant poster session. What great science and great company!

Retreat Group Shot

2015 UR Biology Department retreat group shot in Bristol Harbour, NY.

Annual Department of Biology retreat award winners

Congratulations to the 2015 Department of Biology retreat award winners:

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“Team Cara” poses with the Golden Pipette

Golden Pipette Award: Sophea Chhim, Adil Khan, Chuck Hutti, Cara Brand (EEB), Jovany Martinez (pictured left to right).

Poster competition: Emerson Khost (EEB) and Matthew Johnson (CDM)

Spirit Award: Cara Brand (EEB), Vince Martinson (EEB), Jingyuan Zhang, Tian Zhang

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Emerson Khost, EEB poster contest winner

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Cara Brand (EEB) accepts the Spirit Award on behalf of her team.

Post Doc Position

If anyone is looking for a postdoctoral research position, check out this interesting research at Penn State:

The Baums lab at The Pennsylvania State University is looking for a postdoc to work on coral hybridization genomics, funded by the National Science Foundation. The only widely accepted coral hybrid system consists of the once dominant but now threatened Caribbean species, Acropora cervicornis and A. palmata. In the past, hybrid colonies originating from natural crosses between elkhorn and staghorn corals were rare, and evidence of hybrid reproduction was limited to infrequent matings with the staghorn coral. Recent field observations suggest that the hybrid is increasing and its ecological role is changing throughout the Caribbean. These hybrids appear to be less affected by the disease that led to the mass mortality of their parental species in recent decades. Research will address how the increase in hybridization and perhaps subsequent introgression will affect the current ecological role and the future evolutionary trajectory of Caribbean acroporids.

If interested, apply here!

Departmental Picnic

Please join us TODAY at the Department picnic on the Carlson Library veranda. Chef Hiram will be flipping hamburgers, veggie burgers, and hot dogs. There will also be a variety of salads, chips, desserts and drinks.

The Department will provide the food and drink…you bring the sunshine!! See you all there!