White coats

2014 White Coat Ceremony at SUNY Upstate

2014 White Coat Ceremony at SUNY Upstate

August is the month for white coat ceremonies, the ritual celebration by which medical students are given the traditional coats that are the hallmarks of physicians.  So we’d like to take a moment to salute our former post-bac  students beginning their medical training.  This year’s group are heading to Albany Medical College, SUNY Upstate,  the University at Buffalo, and the University of Rochester.  Congratulations to all of you.  On behalf of the entire post-bac community, I want to say that we’re thrilled to see you moving forward!

Follow Me on Pinterest

Leave a Comment

Filed under alumni, events, med school acceptances

Mad scientists

 

Post-bac students taking a break during Organic Chemistry lab.

Post-bac students taking a break during Organic Chemistry lab.

 

Follow Me on Pinterest

Leave a Comment

Filed under chemistry

MCAT video competition winner!

Jubin Matloubieh

Jubin Matloubieh

We’re as pleased as punch, bursting our buttons, and searching for an appropriate cliche to express our pride.  Jubin Matloubieh, former University of Rochester post-bac pre-med student and current studies facilitator (aka super TA), has won the MCAT video competition.  This contest, sponsored by the Khan Academy, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Association of American Medical Colleges, searched for people to be video-based educators to cover the content of the 2015 MCAT.   This free service will help students (including our post-bac community) prepare for the exam, which will be offered in April, 2015 for the first time.  To read more about Jubin and the other winners, please see this webpage.

Follow Me on Pinterest

Leave a Comment

Filed under alumni, support for students

How we celebrate the first day of spring in Rochester, part II

Happy spring from Rochester, New York

Follow Me on Pinterest

Comments Off

by | March 21, 2014 · 4:55 pm

How we celebrate the first day of spring in Rochester

winter5

We go sledding

i-jdx672X-L

We hang out in chemistry lab

campus_scenes_01

We admire spectacular  sunsets

winter4

We stoically contemplate the vernal equinox

Follow Me on Pinterest

Comments Off

Filed under campus, Eye candy

Handy Resources for Admissions Information

4.18medicalstudentsIf you’re planning to apply to allopathic medical school, consider investing in a subscription the MSAR (Medical School Admissions Requirements).  You can purchase a one-year subscription to the MSAR online here.  This database allows you to search the complete list of US and Canadian medical schools.  You can find descriptions of programs, including descriptions of a school’s curriculum and information about student life.   You can locate student demographics, specialty choices, and median MCAT scores and undergraduate grade point averages.  It’s a very helpful resource.

MSAR2013Online

For those interested in osteopathic medical schools, a similar resource is available in book form.  You can purchase the 2014 Osteopathic Medical College Information Book here, or you can download it as a PDF for no charge.  This book offers program descriptions,  admissions criteria, deadlines, tuition for osteopathic medical schools in the US.

Similar guides are available for pre-dental and pre-veterinary medical students.  The 2013 ADEA Official Guide to Dental Schools, which you can purchase as a printed or e-book, offers similar information about dental school deadlines, admissions criteria, program descriptions, and student demographics.  Its well-designed information tables on individual schools are especially helpful for getting a quick overview.  The Veterinary Medical School Admissions Requirements book can be purchased here.   Its scope spans more than just schools in the US; it includes veterinary medical colleges in Canada, Australia, the United Kingdom, Ireland, New Zealand, Mexico and the Caribbean.

1314cover

Follow Me on Pinterest

Comments Off

Filed under applying to med school

Working as a medical scribe–one way to gain insight to life in as a doctor

8924365-large             How can you be certain that medicine is really right for you?  How will you know whether allopathic or osteopathic medical training will serve you better?  How will you discover whether the sight of blood or a broken bone emerging from the body will make you feel faint?

The answer, of course, is experience:  specifically, observing doctors, being around patients, and soaking in the medical environment wherever and whenever you can. Shadowing, volunteer work in a hospital or hospice setting, working as an EMT, CAN, or nurse—these activities all can provide a prospective medical student with relevant knowledge and experiences.  I want to focus the rest of this post on another option — one you may not have considered before — working as a medical scribe.

Medical scribes, in the words of the New York Times, are “a busy doctor’s right hand, ever ready to type.”  Scribes most commonly work in emergency departments, but can also be employed in other areas of a hospital, clinics, and long-term care facilities.  The benefits to doctors are clear:  physicians can spend more time with their patients because they can spend less time keeping their computer records up to date An increasing number of pre-medical students, including students in the University of Rochester’s Post-bac Pre-med Program, are finding that work as a medical scribe offers a wealth of benefits to a person contemplating medical school.

healthcare_tablet_web

Quite a few of our students are currently working as scribes at Rochester General Hospital.  It’s a serious time commitment; typically scribes work for a minimum of twenty hours a week.  This is a challenging schedule when one is a full-time student, and is certainly not for everyone.  But for the students who do become scribes, it’s a great experience.  First, scribes work closely with a specific physician (including DOs), PA, or nurse practitioner, following him or her throughout the ED as he or she interacts with patients.  It offers unparalleled insight into the health care provider’s decision-making process.  Our students say that after several months of work, they find themselves beginning to predict (silently, of course) which tests a doctor will order, which questions a doctor will ask a patient.  Scribing offers a great opportunity to learn how to take a patient’s history, and to learn medical terminology.  It also gives an opportunity to ask questions in between patient exams.  (And a paycheck comes along with this experience.)

Dr

To learn more about scribing, check out these articles:

A Busy Doctor’s Right Hand, Ever Ready to Type

For ER Doctors, An Extra Hand on the Keyboard (which includes comments from Hannah Smith, a former UR post-bac student, now in medical school)

How Working as a Scribe Prepared Me for Medical School

Follow Me on Pinterest

Comments Off

Filed under post-bac experiences

Happy 2014!

We’re gearing up for a new semester–classes begin on Wednesday.  And we’re right in the heart of application season–please give us a call or send us an e-mail if you have any questions about applying to our program.

Here’s some scenes of life at the University of Rochester for you to enjoy.

Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre--a great place to go to hear some beautiful music

Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre–a great place to go to hear beautiful music

Snow falls on the George Eastman statue overlooking the University of Rochester's Eastman Quad January 2, 2013 / photo by J. Adam Fenster / University of Rochester

Snow falls on the George Eastman statue overlooking the University of Rochester’s Eastman Quad

Walking a labyrinth in  Interfaith Chapel

Walking a labyrinth in Interfaith Chapel

Running at the Goergen Athletic Center

Running at the Goergen Athletic Center

Follow Me on Pinterest

Comments Off

Filed under Eye candy, start of semester

Dancing spleens

 

One of our former students, now a second-year med student at Harvard, sent us a video of one of her most recent accomplishments:  What does the spleen do?

imagesWe knew Margaret was an amazing student; now we also know that she can dance!

Follow Me on Pinterest

Comments Off

Filed under alumni

Fall semester

We’ve been busy this fall.  In addition to the everyday bustle of classes, labs, workshops, homework, and studying, post-bac students have attended a variety of seminars on various topics related to healthcare and science.

 

In September, Nic Hammond, Ph.D. offered an extremely helpful workshop on study skills for chemistry students.  Nic, who has a doctorate in chemistry, is currently investigating STEM pedagogical methods in his work at the University of Rochester’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL).  Nic describes his work for CETL as making science education at UR “the best it can be.”  His workshop focused on aligning post-bac student expectations with faculty expectations for chemistry students.  Most of our students enter our program with excellent time management and study skills, as well as keen motivation to learn.  This workshop focused on how returning students might best use their study time, as well as discussed fruitful ways to approach chemistry problem sets, class lectures, and exam preparation.  Thanks, Nic, for a stimulating (and eye-opening) conversation.

Nic Hammond

Nic Hammond

 

In early October, Dr. Manbir Batra met with students as part of our “Leading a Life in Medicine” speaker series.  Dr. Batra, an anesthesiologist from Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, has been involved in global medicine, and has traveled on a variety of medical missions.  He spoke about his path as a physician, his love of mentoring new and future physicians, and about anesthesiology as a medical practice.  Our post-bac listeners thoroughly enjoyed this conversation.  Here are some of the things they said afterwards:  “the most interesting and engaging talk,” “incredibly interesting,” “Dr Batra was a wonderful person to listen to and also had a great sense of humor.”

Dr. Manbir Batra

Dr. Manbir Batra

 

Later in October, Ben Kress, a post-bac student in his glide year, and Ben Plog, an M.D./Ph.D. student from the University of Rochester Medical School, discussed their work in the lab of Maiken Nedergaard, MD, DMSc.  Dr. Nedergaard’s work on the glymphatic system has been making headlines recently.  Ben and Ben’s presentations on these discoveries were tremendously exciting.  Galvanized by what they heard, several post-bac students wanted to learn more; several post-bac students are now working in the Nedergaard lab at the University of Rochester Medical Center.

Large (green) and small (red) tracers tagged to soluble proteins in the paravascular cerebrospinal fluid.

Large (green) and small (red) tracers tagged to soluble proteins in the paravascular cerebrospinal fluid.

 

Earlier this week, Lili Young, the Assistant Director of Admissions of the New York College of Podiatric Medicine, met with post-bac students to discuss podiatric medicine in general, and the New York College of Podiatric Medicine in specific.   To learn more about podiatric medicine and the path toward becoming a podiatrist, please take a look at the Explore Health Careers website, which offers a good summary of the profession.

Follow Me on Pinterest

Comments Off

Filed under events, Leading a Life in Medicine, Uncategorized