Game Our Ways Into Globalization

Video games play a crucial portion in our modern culture. Around 155 million Americans regularly play video games. Scholars have been examining the effects of violent/prosocial video games on people over various age range and reports back on the changes in human behavior caused by the content of the video games they play. While different researchers show both stat that testifies violent video games desensitizes and prosocial games increase empathy in people and stats that demonstrate no particular significance in the relationship between game content and behavior, most of the sources establish prosocial and nonviolent gaming positively correlates with social connectedness and civic engagement, including the more recent reports.

Empathy is crucial in building strong relationships. As our world become more interconnected through a few examples we’ve raised in class including being emerged in similar types of cultures (literature, visual arts, and performance arts), utilizing congruent media platforms (Fox News, Facebook, New York Times) and personal devices (Phones, computers, fax machines), it becomes more and more of a human responsibility to develop fuller empathetic responses for the greater good; from understanding the unspoken parts of one’s communication with others to seeing the world in higher resolution including the suffering humanity from another continent. We learn from multiple examples how the global technology connections can be harmful or helpful for the thrive of humanity depending upon people’s methods and skills to empathize. Now how can we use video games to teach empathy and limit the opposite in our community? What kind of impacts will empathetic growth contribute toward global unity? What does it mean for people if they become better leaders, followers, and more importantly, better friends?

Potential Scholarly Sources:

Greitemeyer, Tobias, Silvia Osswald, and Markus Brauer. “Playing Prosocial Video Games Increases Empathy and Decreases Schadenfreude.” American Psychological Association 796-802 10.6 (2010): n. pag. Web.

Funk, Jeanne B., Heidi Bechtoldt Baldacci, Tracie Pasold, and Jennifer Baumgardner. “Violence Exposure in Real-life, Video Games, Television, Movies, and the Internet: Is There Desensitization?” Journal of Adolescence 39th ser. 27.23 (2004): n. pag. Science Direct. Web.

Anderson, Craig A. “Violent, Nonviolent, and Prosocial Gaming Effects on Teens’ Civic Engagement.” K. Dill (Ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Media Psychology, New York(2014): n. pag. Oxford University Press. Web.

Smith, Nathan J., “Does Video Game Content Matter? An Examination of Two Competing Ideas” (2015). All Theses and Dissertations. Paper 6026.

Scelsa, Valerie L., “The Effect of Aggressive and Prosocial Video Games on Aggressive and Prosocial Behavior”. Senior Theses, Trinity College, Hartford, CT 2014. Trinity College Digital Repository, http://digitalrepository.trincoll.edu/theses/416

2 thoughts on “Game Our Ways Into Globalization

  1. I think you take an interesting stance from most articles written on the effect of video games on our emotional capacity. I can tell that you’re arguing that certain video games can increase pro-social skills and emotional awareness. I think that since you have the task of changing so many people’s perception of video games, you will need lots of strong examples to solidify your point. One thing to be careful of is to always keep your terms clear. Early, on you will need to establish that only certain kinds of video games can be beneficial to empathy because you don’t want to make a false generalization. When developing you thesis, something to consider might be the benefits we reap from increased video game empathy and how videos games can uniquely contribute as you say, to the ” human responsibility to develop fuller empathetic responses for the greater good.”
    Seeing as how you’re taking to road not traveled in terms of writing about video games effects, this is definitely a debatable topic, as most of the writing in this field supports the opposite of your stance.

  2. I think you start off very well with a very interesting topic that is certainly debatable. Video games are very controversial and they offer a wide range of evaluation and interpretation. There is a lot of potential for you to create a valid argument and counterargument with opposing stances on the effects of video games. Your sources also look like you have a good variety of opinions and backgrounds that can diminish bias. I liked your questions at the end of your proposal, but I think you need to either try to narrow them down into one question or use the others as statements or potential topics, rather than subsequent questions. While it’s good to have a variety of things discuss, you want to have one general focus for your research paper. I’m going to assume your first question is the critical question you will be focusing on most, so I think it contains some good key words that have a specific target. The range of discussion seems like it will be appropriate for the length of the paper we plan on writing. I liked you adding these questions at the end, as a way to spike interest, but I think they may have better use earlier in the second paragraph. It seems like they are unrelated and your questions could be a good way to tie them together, and how you will use these topics in your discussion.

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