Dan’s Research Bio

      • My first research job was in Paul Roche’s lab at the National Institutes of Health, where I worked on MHC Class II trafficking. I was directly supervised by Howard Anderson.
        • Anderson HA, Bergstralh DT, Kawamura T, Blauvelt A, and Roche PA. (1999) Phosphorylation of the invariant chain by protein kinase C regulates MHC class II trafficking to antigen-processing compartments. Journal of Immunology 163(10):5435-43
        • Postbaccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award (1997-99)
  • I undertook my graduate research in Jenny Ting’s lab at the University of North Carolina. My project was to investigate signaling mechanisms underlying cancer chemotherapy, particularly those pathways induced by microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs), a class of drugs that includes the taxane family of chemotherapeutics. I also investigated the nucleolar protein nucleophosmin and its regulation during mitosis.
    • Bergstralh DT, Taxman DJ, Chou T-C, Danishefsky SJ, and Ting JP. (2004) A comparison of signaling activities induced by Taxol and Desoxyepothilone B. Journal of Chemother. 16(6):563-76
    • Bergstralh DT and Ting JP. (2006) Microtubule stabilizing agents: Their molecular signaling consequences and the potential for enhancement by drug combination. Cancer Treat. Rev. 32(3):166-79
    • Bergstralh DT, Conti BJ, Moore CB, Brickey WJ, Taxman DJ, and Ting JP. (2007) Global functional analysis of nucleophosmin in Taxol response, cancer, chromatin regulation, and ribosomal DNA transcription. Exp. Cell Res. 313(1):65-76
  • Following my thesis defense, Stephen Willingham and I showed that expression of disease-associated mutants of the protein NLRP3 induces a pathway of cell death with morphological features of necrosis. This pathway is a programmed response with important immunological consequences. I also worked with Chris Moore to characterize the antiviral effector NLRX1.
    • Duncan JA, Bergstralh DT, Wang Y, Willingham SB, Ye Z, Zimmerman AG, and Ting JP. (2007) Cryopyrin/NALP3 binds ATP/dATP, is an ATPase, and requires ATP binding to mediate inflammatory signaling. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 104(19):8041-8046
    • Willingham SB*, Bergstralh DT*, O’Connor W, Taxman DJ, Morrison AC, Duncan JA, Barnoy S, Venkatesan MM, Flavell RA, Deshmukh M, Hoffman H, and Ting JP. (2007) Featured ArticleMicrobial pathogen-induced necrotic cell death mediated by the inflammasome components CIAS1/Cryopyrin/NLRP3 and ASC. Cell Host & Microbe 2(3):147-159
    • Moore CB, Bergstralh DT, Duncan JA, Lei Y, Morrison TE, Zimmermann AG, Accavitti-Loper MA, Madden VJ, Sun L, Ye Z, Lich JD, Heise M, Chen ZJ, and Ting JP. (2008) – NLRX1 is an inhibitor of mitochondrial antiviral immunity. Nature 451(7178):573-7
    • Ting JP, Willingham SB, and Bergstralh DT. (2008) NLR proteins at the intersection of cell death and immunity. Nature Rev. Immunology 8(5):372-9
    • Willingham SB*, Allen IC*, Bergstralh DT*, Brickey WJ, Taxman DJ, Huang MT, Duncan JA, and Ting JP. (2009) NLRP3 (NALP3, cryopyrin) facilitates in vivo caspase-1, necrosis, & HMGB1 release via inflammasome-dependent and -independent pathways (* equal contribution) Journal of Immunol. 183(3):2008-2015
    • After grad school, I decided to shift from biomedical research into basic research. I got a lot of help from my postdoc supervisor Jeff Sekelsky. My work in his lab revolved around three proteins – MUS312, ERCC1, and MEI-9 – implicated in both meiotic recombination and the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Jeff and I identified BTBD12 as the vertebrate ortholog of Drosophila MUS312. In collaboration with Sabrina Andersen, I analyzed its function in flies and cultured cells.
      • Bergstralh DT and Sekelsky J. (2008) Interstrand crosslink repair: Can XPF-ERCC1 be let off the hook? Trends in Genetics 24(2):70-6
      • Andersen SL*, Bergstralh DT*, Kohl K, LaRocque JR, Moore CB, and Sekelsky J. (2009) Featured Article – Drosophila MUS312 and its vertebrate ortholog, BTBD12, interact with DNA structure-specific endonucleases in DNA repair and recombination Molecular Cell 35(1):128-135
      • Lineberger Postdoctoral Fellowship (2007-08)
    • I continued my postdoctoral research in Daniel St Johnston’s lab in the Gurdon Institute at the University of Cambridge. My first project, which was meant to build on earlier work in the lab, ran into some difficulty. Timm Haack and I worked together to explain the problem. The project that I developed subsequently forms the basis of my independent research. Much of this work was done in cooperation with Holly Lovegrove.
      • Bergstralh DT and St Johnston D. (2012) Epithelial Cell Polarity: What Flies Can Teach Us About Cancer. Essays in Biochem. 53(1):129-40. (invited chapter)
      • Bergstralh DT, Lovegrove HE, and St Johnston D. (2013) Discs large links spindle orientation to apical-basal polarity in Drosophila Current Biology 23(17):1707-12
      • Haack T*, Bergstralh DT*, and St Johnston D. (2013) Damage to the Drosophila follicle cell epithelium produces “false clones” with apparent polarity phenotypes. (* equal contribution) Biology Open 2(12):1313-20
      • Bergstralh DT and St Johnston D. (2014) Spindle Orientation: What if it Goes Wrong? Seminars Cell Dev Biol 34C:140-145 (invited review)
      • Bergstralh DT*, Lovegrove HE*, and St Johnston D. (2015) A mechanism for reintegrating misplaced cells into epithelial monolayers (* equal contribution) Nature Cell Biology Nov;17(11):1497-503
      • Bergstralh DT, Lovegrove HE, Kujawiak I, Zhu J, Cooper S, Zhang R, and St Johnston D. (2016) Highlighted Article – Pins is not required for spindle orientation in the Drosophila imaginal wing. Development 143(14):2573-2581
      • Marshall Sherfield Fellowship (2008-09)
      • Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship (2009-11)
      • Research Fellowship, Clare Hall, University of Cambridge (2009-15)